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Photos: 30 from '10

Lately I’ve made a collection of my own favorite photos of the year, selected as usual according to top-secret, unreliable and entirely arbitrary criteria. Here’s the set for 2010:

30 from '10

It was quite a year: We began with five+ feet of snow in five days (3rd largest storm on record for Flagstaff), had huge wildfire on the San Francisco Peaks, and pretty much from August onward it was all Baby Joy, all the time.

Quite a year, indeed. Happy 2011!

Lightroom 3 to iPad gallery workflow

(Or, an efficient way to use Lightroom to manage photos on your iPad)

I got myself an iPad a few weeks ago. Short review: It’s a big iPhone only in the sense that an iPhone is just a phone; that is, it’s hawt and I love it. (More ZOMG iPad articles to follow, I’m sure.)

The iPad really shows off photos, so I’ve been thinking about the best way to manage the photos that I want to put on it. With the non-beta release of Lightroom 3 this week, I think I’ve found a start at a workflow in the new publishing service that it offers.

First a note about syncing photos to the iPad. Like the iPod/iPhone, you have to select a single parent directory, and optionally subdirectories, of photos that you want to sync. The iPad stores photos in a series of albums simply named after the subdirectory where they live on your hard drive. In my case, I keep the photos that I publish out of Lightroom in one of a number of subfolders of a ~/Pictures/Exported Photos directory, but I don’t necessary want to sync all of them to the iPad. And, for the iPad, I wanted a little more control over the album naming for purposes of navigation — so I didn’t want to keep the directory names I’ve previously used for simple file management.

So: I have an “iPad” directory in my exports folder, and that’s what I sync to the iPad — along with all its subdirectories. I’ve copied a handful of existing albums into that directory, which isn’t a great solution but it does work for now. Apple has apparently decided that symbolic links cannot be synced [that would be a great capability, wouldn’t it?], so I can’t simply create links to the file locations of the existing, non-Lightroom albums that I want to sync.

iPad sync directory; Lightroom 3 publish service directories are subfolders of this

But the Lightroom albums are another story. Right now, I’ve simply created a couple of Hard Drive publish services, each of which publishes to a subdirectory of that “iPad” folder I described above. For example, the current flickr one simply sets up a set of export parameters for photos that will be published to a subdir.

Lightroom 3 Hard Drive publish service setup

But the slick part comes by making a smart collection that will publish everything I post to flickr in 2010. Simply build the smart collection within the publish service:

Creating a published smart folder in Lightroom 3

And then set it to include all photos that match some key criteria: Since I use Jeffery Friedl’s flickr plugin, I can call directly on the metadata it creates at export:

Published Smart folder settings to include a subset of Flickr-published photos

I now have a smart collection within a publish service, so the photos that I export that match that criteria will automatically be added. I’ll have to occasionally republish to the service itself; and each time I do so, the iPad will gather up those photos the next time I sync.

You can use the same methodology to set up hard drive publish services for any album you like; each service will appear on the iPad as an album, and if you create a smart collection (or a series of them) as part of the service, then they’ll be updated automatically as you perform you regular photo workflow.

One final note on why I think the publish service is an ideal tool for this workflow, rather than a solution such as simply exporting to a folder: The publish service will apply future changes to the service settings to all photos under its control. So, were I to decide to apply a watermark, a border (via, for example, LR/Mogrify 2), or adjust photo quality in order to save space on the iPad, those changes made to the publish service would result in the option to re-process the current photos:

Publish service allows for the updating of all published photos when changes are made to the service

In a sense, then, the photos produced via the publish service are truly synced — future changes will be managed and will trigger re-processing, if I choose. I think that’s pretty Good Stuff.

2009 / some favorite photos

Selected again by capricious point and click, these are a few of my favorite photos from 2009.

Some picks from 2009

Click over to flickr for the full set!

Relative sized borders in Lightroom 2

I’m sure the rest of you figured this out ages ago, but it was a new realization to me. In addition to supporting multiple, different borders per image, the LR2/Mogrify border options for Lightroom 2 allow for borders to be applied on three metrics: pixel size, percent of height, and percent of width. That allow, for example, for easy application of letterbox-style top and bottom borders without needing to pay any attention to the cropped dimension of your image.

Screenshot - selecting fixed-percentage borders in Lightroom 2/LR2 Mogrity

The plugin default is in pixels; just switch to percent and you’re off. Something in the range of 10-12% of height seems to suit my eye pretty well.

Facebook network visualization

Quick ‘n dirty visualization of the clusters of relationships among my facebook friends:

Facebook network visualization

Data generated with Bernie Hogan’s My Online Social Network app on facebook, and visualized with GUESS. Good stuff, Bernie!

Thanks to Marc Smith — he’s one of the nodes up there — for the link to the flickr version of this image over at Connected Action.

Brayden King and Kieran Healy (they’re up there in my visualization, too) have posted their own plots over at orgtheory: one, two.

Feelin' fine

Way cool:

(image page at flickr)

We Feel Fine aggregates and provides clicky-feely visualizations of expressions of emotions online, via text found in blogs, flickr pages and google.

I spent a good chunk of today trying to figure out why a single dumb plot was coming out all hinky; these guys have colored affect balls swirling apparently effortlessly around your mouse cursor. I feel inadequate, sure, but I feel wildly enthusiastic, as well. This is cool stuff.

(Via Chris at Ruminate.)


About, the short version

I’m a sociologist-errant. This site is powered by Textpattern, Pair Networks and the sociological imagination. For more about me and this site, see the long version.

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